St Patrick

‘St patrick’, is one of four identical yachts designed by GL Watson & Co. to the Boat Racing Assocation 18ft Class and built by William Fife in 1919.   These were the first racing yachts to be ordered after the First World War and were named after the UK’s patron saints. ‘St Patrick’ has been restored by Fairlie Restorations alongside GL Watson & Co.

History

The “Saints” were commissioned by Capt. L. Lindsay-Smith for the Royal Salcombe Yacht Club. After only a year at Salcombe and a further 3 years on the South Coast, all four boats were purchased by the Royal Norfolk & Suffolk Yacht Club where they were based until 1930.   After being sold by the RN&SYC from Gt. Yarmouth, St Patrick went to the River Deben where she changed owners twice and later went to Brightlingsea before dropping out of Lloyds Register for Yachts in 1952.

Having been raced and cruised on Loch Ryan, Patrick has subsequently been retrieved by G.L. Watson after she was found to be on the Isle of Whithorn in Dumfries & Galloway. It is estimated that the boat had been immobile in a garden there for 20-25 years since her last owner took her on.

Restoration

G.L. Watson & Co. and Fairlie Restorations have undertaken a full and authentic restoration of the yacht, returning her to full sailing order.

All fastenings were in need of replacement and a large percentage of wood replaced. However, as much original material as practicable has been retained and a policy of like for like has been employed.   Original fittings have been re-used where possible throughout the yacht and replica metalwork has been as authentic as possible, in keeping with the period and aesthetics of the class.   Deck fittings have been nickel plated as indicated by the many original fittings found with the boat. The canvassed white pine decks have also been replaced like for like as indicated by the original. Traditional canvassing methods and solutions have been employed again to ensure authenticity.

Re-launch

St Patrick was re-launched on 30 June 2011 at Fairlie Restorations, Port Hamble. With freshly painted canvas decks, gleaming paint and varnish work and immaculate nickel plated metalwork, St Patrick is now back to her original 1919 G. L. Watson & Co. design. Complete with traditional Ratsey & Lapthorn sails, St Patrick will be sailing again in early July on the Solent before heading to the Clyde which will become her new home.

SHARE THIS:

Yachts for Sale

Recently updated...

Tuiga
Tuiga sails on by
Back in 2017 we were taking in the views on the Bay of Palma. The timing happily...
Elena 22 1
Elena under pressure!
Back in 2022 the mistral blew and the Big Boat class took to the race course and...
Belv classic crop
Great SF Schooner Regatta & Belvedere Classic
Member of Freda scan the horizon Writing and photos by Martha Blanchfield / Renegade...
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
The Rime Of The Ancient Mariner
A statue of ‘The Ancient Mariner’ with the albatross around his neck. By...

Write an Article

Covering news on classic yachting worldwide is a tall ask and with your input Classic Yacht Info can expose stories from your own back yard.

We are keen to hear about everything from local regattas and classic events to a local restoration or yachting adventure. Pictures are welcome and ideal for making the article more engaging.

With a site that has been created with the assistance of an international group of classic yacht enthusiasts we value your input and with your help we strive to make CYI more up-to-date and more informative than ever.

Please register and get in touch if you would like to contribute.

Submit a Classic Yacht Book

Expand the CYI reading list by adding a book of interest that covers one of the many areas of Classic Yachting.

As a site that has been created with the assistance of an international group of classic yacht enthusiasts we value your input and with your help we strive to make CYI more up-to-date and more informative than ever.

Please register and get in touch if you would like to contribute.

ClassicYachtInfo.com has the largest database of classic yachts on the internet.

We’re continually working to keep it accurate and up-to-date, and we greatly appreciate contributions of any type. If you spot an error, or you have some information on a yacht and would like to contribute, please jump on in!

Don’t be shy…. Breeze on!